MIKE MANGINI RHYTHM KNOWLEDGE PDF

Mike designed Rhythm Knowledge as a behavioral change system to help himself learn to be a better player and teacher. He based it in cognitive science, software engineering and natural laws. He tested it on himself, his students and anyone willing try out learning something they previously did not know. If you want the short version of what R. Although these books are mainly written for drummers, the thinking can be applied to any musical instrument, hand-eye coordination activity, sports skill development, personal change, or academic discipline. One thing to know is what the books are not.

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At first the Dream Theater camp went into media lockdown. Behind closed doors, however, privately held auditions were being filmed for a three-part, reality-TV-style documentary called The Spirit Carries On, which would tell the tale of the seven world-class drummers chosen to audition over the course of three days at SIR studios in New York City.

It was obvious from the videos that many of these monster players could cover the gig. The deciding factor was who would be the best fit, both musically and personally. After careful deliberation and intense dissection of the video performances, it was a unanimous Dream Theater decision that the right person to fill this prestigious, much-scrutinized role was former Steve Vai drummer and Berklee instructor Mike Mangini. Mike has effectively had the golden torch of prog metal drumming passed directly to him, and on the new DT release he takes full artistic advantage, injecting the highly evolved technique of the new breed of super-drummers into the complex odd-meter structures that the progressive genre is noted for.

By employing his own Rhythm Knowledge method and advanced four-way independence, he has been able to orchestrate rhythmically dense drum parts in a musical context, elevating an already adventurous band approach further than most observers imagined possible.

There had been much speculation about how—and if—Dream Theater would carry on without Portnoy. For Mike and for Dream Theater alike, it has truly been a dramatic turn of events. MD: How does it feel to be back on the road after eleven years, touring in a high-profile band? I truly appreciate every little thing. You stepped out of a high-profile gig with the possibility of never returning as a big-stage performer.

Mike: It was all about faith and economics. I believe this has happened because I have a system that works and because I pick things that I really want to do. My drive to start a family was primary when I left Steve Vai.

Once I had made that decision, the economics stepped in when I discovered that I could double my income by teaching and doing clinics. This was wonderful for several years. I had my family, my house, and a great job, but I was starting to feel the urge to be in a band again. My wife even noticed and encouraged me to look for a band to start working with. MD: Has your time teaching at Berklee helped sharpen your skills for touring and recording with Dream Theater?

Mike: Absolutely. It was as much the students as it was the environment and my fellow faculty. I was always inspired when I would listen to other faculty members perform. And the students—who I had an incredible bond with—helped me to grow as a player by sharing new ideas and turning me on to a lot of drummers that I would have otherwise never heard of. But working at the school as a full-time faculty member was starting to consume way more time than I was comfortable with.

And my old sports injuries were not helping matters. MD: What types of injuries? Mike: My right knee was destroyed from three decades of sports injuries. I finally found out why my upper leg was dying.

I literally could not hold my leg up and began to have trouble walking. Did they send you a finished demo and ask you to emulate the drum tracks? Mike: First off, after they informed me that I had the gig, nothing happened for several months. We just talked and really got to know each other. I still had my full-time job at Berklee and outside work, and I was busy keeping up with that. I listened to his drum machine part and learned it first, and then I began to alter it the way I wanted to.

The songs were complex and epic. So I spent most of my time transcribing the tunes away from the kit, and with the time I had left I practiced the material on the kit. Once I began learning the new material on the kit, I was able to orchestrate a combination of his drum machine parts and ideas that I wanted to play. And when I opened the boxes of drums, which have thick copper staples, I dislocated a bone in my wrist. So I listened to the music and worked with my feet the best I could.

MD: How did you approach learning older DT material for the first tour? By playing along with the DVDs I got a great feel for how to best approach the catalog, and then I altered my kit to accommodate the material.

MD: What was the recording experience like when you finally got to the studio? We would reference the demo for certain parts, which was very helpful. So between his demo drums and my ideas, we were able to agree on parts that we were both happy with. I worked strictly with John to produce all the tracks. MD: With such complex and lengthy compositions, what is your process for learning and memorizing the drum parts?

Mike: First I outline it on paper. Then I sectionalize things. Once I have the arrangement sectionalized, I can get more microscopic with understanding what I need to learn. I also listen for specific parts. And that was not just five minutes of practice. That took some time and was microscopic. Then I start to attack the hardest thing first.

MD: Can you go into more depth about how you outline each track? Mike: I taught a course on this at Berklee, and I call this type of outline a block form. This helps convert lengthy notated charts to the language of a physical shape and reduce it to half a page. Next to the first number would be the first phrase of the song with a specific number of bars, time signature changes, etc.

Then you would go to number 2 and chart it out the same way, so you can start to see the similarities within each section and memorize the song in blocks, or sections. And then I can get microscopic from there and expand the format by writing detailed musical notation of a very specific and complex part.

It helps me to actually see the structure of the song in my head. MD: What was the most challenging aspect of this new recording? Mike: It was maintaining the velocity of my playing with my legs and feet. I had not fully recovered from my knee surgery, and every bass drum hit was maximum velocity, with the beater buried into the head. MD: How do you develop your oddmeter grooves and make them musical within such complex arrangements?

Mike: My thought process is totally about picking the main frequencies that best fit the music and then catching the key phrase points while keeping a consistent meter. My favorite drum machine parts from the demos were the ones that hit the key phrase points in the music.

Most of my embellishments to the demo drums were to catch more of these key points. Within all this, something has to keep a consistent meter, and it has to be frequency-based. MD: How and when did you decide that this type of advanced drumming would be your calling card? Mike: I believe that our musicality is a gift. We showed up on earth, and we were each given a gift. The other side is developing the skill, which leaves it open for anybody to make the decision to sacrifice and learn how to do this, if they have the calling.

Not everyone has the calling to do what I do. The thing that makes this type of drumming limitless is the musicality of what you can create. I think that every musician should follow their calling and be the best at whatever that calling may be.

MD: How do you feel about your playing with Dream Theater so far? Mike: I feel so much better than I imagined I would feel. My whole joy with this band has to do with a completion in my life—to finally work with a band that appreciates what I do and why I do it. I really needed that.

One of the most important things that the audition documentary did for the fans was to let them see that I really did want to be in this band and that I took the Dream Theater music very seriously. We only had one full run through of the entire two-hour set before we played our first show. All the rest of our time was spent working on the new gear for the tour. But it really is a whole different world for the band with me on stage.

My job is to support the music and shift the focus from the drummer to the rest of the band. MD: A big difference in the new music is that the band sounds more refined. That says a lot about your musicianship and professionalism. Mike: I believe that when you make a decision for the right reasons, usually the right things happen. Do I really want the gig because I love the music, or do I want it because there might be more money to be made?

I wanted to be in Dream Theater because I love the music and I love the players in the band. How did you develop your technique? Mike: I developed my speed and strength by practicing patterns such as paradiddles and odd single-stroke groupings between the two farthest instruments on the drumkit, from left to right. This develops the muscle groups of the entire body. Developing accuracy and power with such distance makes it easier—and strengthens the accuracy and power—from short distances, which is where we do the majority of our playing on the kit.

The bulk of my speed comes from the wrist and the top and bottom of the forearm, which is also an extension of my back and shoulder muscles. The source of the power comes from the flexing of the larger muscle groups. This produces the extra strength and velocity to knock someone over from an inch away. MD: How do the fingers come into play in your hand technique?

Mike: My finger control comes mainly from the thumb muscle.

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Mike Mangini

At first the Dream Theater camp went into media lockdown. Behind closed doors, however, privately held auditions were being filmed for a three-part, reality-TV-style documentary called The Spirit Carries On, which would tell the tale of the seven world-class drummers chosen to audition over the course of three days at SIR studios in New York City. It was obvious from the videos that many of these monster players could cover the gig. The deciding factor was who would be the best fit, both musically and personally. After careful deliberation and intense dissection of the video performances, it was a unanimous Dream Theater decision that the right person to fill this prestigious, much-scrutinized role was former Steve Vai drummer and Berklee instructor Mike Mangini.

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Mike Mangini – Living The Dream

Biografie[ bewerken brontekst bewerken ] Mike Mangini begon met drummen toen hij twee-en-half jaar oud was. Hij oefende twee uur per dag en op negenjarige leeftijd speelde hij Buddy Rich al na. Tijdens het voortgezet onderwijs deed hij mee aan speciale opleidingen op county-, state- en oostelijk Amerika-niveau. Nadat Mangini zijn diploma had behaald op Waltham Senior High School in , zette hij zijn muziekstudie opzij voor een studie computerwetenschappen op de universiteit van Bentley. Na zijn studie programmeerde hij software voor de Patriotraket.

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Mike mangini rhythm knowledge pdf definitely, Nxgs driver, Squarez game. Mike mangini rhythm knowledge pdf free download really, Definicion de desarrollo sustentable pdf, Rosetta stone curriculum pdf. Some use of circadian rhythm knowledge.. A complete system for expanding your skills as a creative player and improviser, focusing in on your own musical identity.

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He has consistently developed both the melodic and rhythmic sides of his musical personality. He has documented his command of these styles on recordings, with Internationally Renown and Multi Platinum Selling bands, as a multi-time Grammy nominee, as the featured clinician at most every drum festival in the world, and as a full-time faculty member at Berklee College of Music along with being named to their Educational Committee and as Advisor to the Percussion students. He is both teacher and student. He has been performing since the age of 4 and studying music since age 5. Since he has given private instruction to drummers, guitarists, and pianists. Michael completed his first drum clinic tour in , and since then he has traveled the world as a clinician selling out venues in over 40 countries.

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