JAWANZA KUNJUFU PDF

He is the founder and president of African American Images, a Chicago-based publishing company that sponsors dozens of workshops intended to help educators and parents develop practical solutions to the problems of child-rearing in what he perceives to be a racist society. Kunjufu holds advanced degrees in business and economics that have enabled him to place the problems of black society in the larger context of national and international economic models. Born on June 15, , in Chicago, Kunjufu—who adopted a Swahili name in —credits his parents, Eddie and Mary Brown, with affording him the encouragement, discipline, and stability that would later become the core of his program for the renewal of black society. As a young man, Kunjufu was urged by his father to volunteer his time at a number of different jobs, working without pay in exchange for learning firsthand how businesses and skilled craftsmen went about their work.

Author:Yozshutaxe Kazizuru
Country:Portugal
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Spiritual
Published (Last):2 May 2008
Pages:302
PDF File Size:18.91 Mb
ePub File Size:7.60 Mb
ISBN:917-1-98878-519-1
Downloads:64155
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Vikora



In , Kunjufu founded and became president of African American Images, a Chicago-based publishing company that offers a culturally relevant curriculum for both students and teachers. He also holds workshops that help parents navigate through an educational system rife with racial bias against their children, who oftentimes find themselves working against teacher expectations. Such teacher assumptions presume criminality, a lack of motivation, and an inherent lack of ability to perform.

Instead, Kunjufu believes that Black children need to be exposed to a curriculum that builds on their strengths, affirms their culture and treats them with dignity and compassion. The strong proponent of single-gender classrooms has also addressed, in-depth, the underlying implicit bias that has resulted in so many disparities for African-American girls in two of his books: Educating Black Girls and Raising Black Girls. There is a wide range — for example, some cities like Detroit, East St.

It is not much better for Black females. Now, there are a myriad of reasons for this dropout rate. So you literally were pushed out of elementary school because of your age. And unfortunately, many of our youth who are in special education are not on the grade level when they matriculate to the higher grade which is why I wonder why do they call it special.

Kunjufu: Yes, and again that could take days in terms of an interview to cover all of it. Let me quickly say that Brown vs. Topeka was in And the assumption was that if we could have integrated schools, many of our problems would be resolved. We received special education in And why is it that white girls are placed in special education the least, and African-American males the greatest? Kunjufu: Yes. But I am in no way saying that all white teachers are bad and all Black teachers are good.

But I do think that it is important that every once in a while, you have a teacher who looks like you. There are schools where there is not one Black male in the building.

And you can count the number of Black males who teach primary and intermediate. With one of my earlier books, Countering the Conspiracy to Destroy Black Boys, a lot of people, who want to be politically correct have concerns and problems with the word conspiracy. Like who planned it? And what date did they plan it? And so what I decided to do rather than argue over language is to just look at the data. And whatever word you want to use to explain how this happens, is fine with me.

The main thing is that 6 does not equal 50 and something is very wrong. Kunjufu: I think it is a great idea and over , African-American parents are homeschooling their children.

On most test scores, whites and Asians are scoring around the 80th percentile, Blacks and Hispanics are at the 40th percentile. But the good news is that when Black children are homeschooled they score at the 82nd percentile. There is no racial achievement gap between white and Black children who are both homeschooled.

However, when Black children are taught by teachers who love them, whether in a school or in the home, they thrive. But when they are taught by teachers, who do not love them, who do not like them, who do not respect them, who do not understand their culture and learning styles, they do not do as well. Kunjufu: I think she is incompetent. She should not have the position at all! DeVos is definitely in favor of privatizing public education.

She is not creative. She is not interested in closing the achievement gap for low-income Black and Hispanic students. Kunjufu: There is no question that parenting is definitely a real dilemma in the Black community. So that is a problem. And I commend those single parenting mothers who are doing a fantastic job of not only being the provider but also the nurturer and disciplinarian simultaneously.

I was watching the show Power series on Starz. Are you familiar with the show? Kunjufu: Yes, this is very interesting. Now what does this say?

One of our most premiere civil rights organizations feels that our best TV show is Power and our best movie is Girls Trip! I have major concerns about the imagery of Power and of the Girls Trip movie. But unfortunately, the sales and the ratings show that the Black community likes watching these kinds of shows. I was appalled at the level of violence showcased. Kunjufu: I, like you, had to turn Power off.

I only wanted to watch it, so that I could stay current with our audience and would know what they are talking about.

It was just too violent. Kunjufu: And Girls Trip, I have not seen it, I read the reviews, but it is about four mature women who literally act like whores on a vacation.

But the ratings and the sales for the film were off the chart. He invited me to speak on a panel. I never called it Black Educational Television.

It was always Black Entertainment Television. Kunjufu: Almost every rapper will tell you, that if you want to get paid, then you have to be violent, you have to be raw, you have to be rough, you have to be sexist, you have to be a misogynist. So you have to commend clean rappers like Common and the Christian hip-hop performer Lecrae. Unfortunately, these types of artists are few and far between. So you have a very high rate of recidivism.

There is no money to be made in rehabilitating prisoners. The objective is to get these prisoners to either never leave or to come back. So this is something that is not cost-effective. In comparison to pre-school education, Head Start, Title I, Pell grants — those are all cost-effective programs. I personally thought that being a male, I had an advantage of understanding the male culture.

I did, however, write two books that are doing very well, in terms of educating Black girls. Kunjufu: I am very concerned that one out of every two Black female teenagers has a sexually transmitted disease STD.

So we are looking at females between the ages of There is one in every four teenage girls in America who has an STD. But, it is worse for our girls. It is one out of every two. Our young Black females are in trouble. And so while Black boys are suspended at a much higher rate than young Black females, the suspension rate is not good for girls either. And some of the disciplinary problems that are going on in our schools indicate that all is not well with our females.

AL ADAB AL MUFRAD URDU PDF

Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu's Articles

In , Kunjufu founded and became president of African American Images, a Chicago-based publishing company that offers a culturally relevant curriculum for both students and teachers. He also holds workshops that help parents navigate through an educational system rife with racial bias against their children, who oftentimes find themselves working against teacher expectations. Such teacher assumptions presume criminality, a lack of motivation, and an inherent lack of ability to perform. Instead, Kunjufu believes that Black children need to be exposed to a curriculum that builds on their strengths, affirms their culture and treats them with dignity and compassion.

SMA 6000TL PDF

Jawanza Kunjufu Biography

He is the founder and president of African American Images, a Chicago -based publishing company that sponsors dozens of workshops intended to help educators and parents develop practical solutions to the problems of child-rearing in what he perceives to be a racist society. Kunjufu holds advanced degrees in business and economics that have enabled him to place the problems of black society in the larger context of national and international economic models. Born on June 15, , in Chicago, Kunjufu—who adopted a Swahili name in —credits his parents, Eddie and Mary Brown, with affording him the encouragement, discipline, and stability that would later become the core of his program for the renewal of black society. As a young man, Kunjufu was urged by his father to volunteer his time at a number of different jobs, working without pay in exchange for learning firsthand how businesses and skilled craftsmen went about their work. Kunjufu attended Illinois State University at Normal and received a bachelor of science degree in economics in Ten years later he finished a doctorate in business administration at Union Graduate School.

IRENAEAN THEODICY PDF

Dr. Kunjufu: Who He is and What He Does

.

APOPTOSIS VA INTRINSECA Y EXTRINSECA PDF

Jawanza Kunjufu

.

Related Articles