ALLANBLACKIA FLORIBUNDA PDF

The medium-sized tree up to 30 meters tall is evergreen and dioecious male and female flowers on different plants. The wood is said to be resistant to termites but is not particularly durable. In Ghana small trees are cut for poles and find use as mine pit-props and bridge-piles. The twigs are used in Ghana as candlesticks, and the smaller ones as chew-sticks and tooth-picks in Ghana and Gabon. The bark has anodynal properties.

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Introduction[ edit ] The volumes of Allanblackia seeds, and hence seed oil, produced until now very low. The volume of allanblackia seed oil is in the range of metric tonnes per annum only. When initial studies on the potential of wild-harvesting were done in the early s, the expectations were very high predicting annual production of up to 40, tonnes of seeds. In reality only a few tonnes of seeds were harvested in the first year as the number of wild Allanblackia trees that could actually be harvested had severely been overestimated.

Through the plantation of the tree with local farmers in Tanzania, Ghana and Nigeria, the production volumes are expected to increase in the coming decade, once these trees are old enough to starting producing fruits and big enough to carry more of the large fruit pods.

For example, the value of Allanblackia as a new cash annual crop for Africa means training of local communities not to cut Allanblackia trees for use as timber and firewood. But doing so is also a means of helping to conserve local biodiversity. The Union for Ethical Biotrade UEBT has developed a standard and a verification framework against which the sustainability of the Allanblackia supply chain can be audited and approved.

Since , Novel Development Tanzania has been involved in a domestication program together with the World Agroforestry Centre ICRAF to domesticate the species using participatory tree domestication approach. The program includes community sensitization, exploration, participatory selections of superior mother trees, conservation in field gene banks, development of agroforestry systems with Allanblackia and market development. Secondly, the program consists of developing asexual and sexual propagation protocols, which are necessary to overcome challenges in multiplication such as seed dormancy, long juvenile phase and high variability of desired traits.

The domestication program of Allanblackia through public-private partnership and participatory tree domestication could serve as a model for domestication of other underutilized African tree species of high economic potential. In Ghana Allanblackia parviflora fruits have been reported to have a weight of 1. The may containing up to separate seeds embedded in a pulp.

Harvesters will collect these fallen fruits and manually extract and clean the seeds. These are then laid out in the sun to dry; this generally takes one to two weeks. Upon drying the color of the inside mesocarp of the seeds will change from off-white wet to ocreous-brown dry.

Next to that seeds are checked for the amount of dirt, while broken seeds are removed. Also seeds infected by insects are removed. Such seeds can be recognized by small holes present in the outer shell of the seeds.

The seeds collected are put into bags again and brought to a local warehouse waiting to be transported to the oil mill. Seed and oil processing[ edit ] From local warehouses the seeds are brought to a central warehouse at the oil mill to press-out the oil. In Tanzania the Allanblackia Oil Mill is in the coastal city of Tanga, in the north-east of the country. In the mill the seeds are taken out of the bags and stored locally until crushing. For the crushing a seed-oil press is used, separating the oil from the residual fibrous cake.

The crude oil is decanted and filtered to remove remaining solids. The remaining cake from the pressing still contains fibers and residual oil] and therefore it is used as a renewable source of energy in the oil mill, generating steam in a high pressure steam boiler.

After transport to the country where the final product manufacturing will take place, the oil is purified according to standard practices to remove unwanted free fatty acids and off-taste, making the oil ready for use in manufacturing of products, e. Application in product[ edit ] Historical use[ edit ] In Tanzania the use of allanblackia seed oil goes back almost a century. It has been reported that during the First World War allanblackia oil was already tested as a cocoa butter alternative.

Also in the seventies the such application was again explored in Europe. However the application never hit the market because larger volumes of the oil were simply not available due to the lack of an organized supply chain. Most of the allanblackia trees nowadays remaining in the wild are growing in the East Usambara Mountains which provides the right climate for this tree.

As a result, even today the volumes of oil available from wild-harvesting are still very small.

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Allanblackia floribunda

Introduction[ edit ] The volumes of Allanblackia seeds, and hence seed oil, produced until now very low. The volume of allanblackia seed oil is in the range of metric tonnes per annum only. When initial studies on the potential of wild-harvesting were done in the early s, the expectations were very high predicting annual production of up to 40, tonnes of seeds. In reality only a few tonnes of seeds were harvested in the first year as the number of wild Allanblackia trees that could actually be harvested had severely been overestimated. Through the plantation of the tree with local farmers in Tanzania, Ghana and Nigeria, the production volumes are expected to increase in the coming decade, once these trees are old enough to starting producing fruits and big enough to carry more of the large fruit pods. For example, the value of Allanblackia as a new cash annual crop for Africa means training of local communities not to cut Allanblackia trees for use as timber and firewood.

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Allanblackia oil

Hamadina, Joseph A. Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Introduction 2. Materials and Methods 2.

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